Google search will feel a lot different. These are all the updates coming soon

Brett Molina
USA TODAY
A look at Google's redesigned search results.

Your experience with Google search will soon look different.

The tech giant introduced a series of updates planned for Google search aimed at making results more visual and providing extra context.

For example, a demo of the new search tools shows a user opening Google Lens to review a pattern on a shirt. After capturing the pattern, the user searches for socks with a similar pattern.

In another example, Lens is used to take a picture of a bike part, then typing "how to fix" to get results on making the repair.

Search results will also include a new section with additional information called "things to know." If you look up "acrylic painting," as an example, you'll see related topics like step-by-step, tips or how to clean. This will also work when searching for videos.

Google did not specify when the feature arrives but said it would be in the coming months.

The new Things to Know section coming soon to Google search results.

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Queries, or searches, will also display more context about the source of a particular result, including what others have said about a website.

The company said it is using an artificial intelligence tool called Multitask Unified Model (MUM) to make search results more robust.

"There's more information accessible at people's fingertips than at any point in human history," said Prabhakar Raghavan, senior vice president at Google, in a blog post. "And advances in artificial intelligence will radically transform the way we use that information."

Google will also leverage AI for shopping searches through its platform. Users of the Google app on iOS will soon have the option to make all images searchable using Lens. Browsing for items like clothes will also get an upgrade with more visual results, and users will be able to find out whether an item is in stock directly from Google's search results.

Follow Brett Molina on Twitter: @brettmolina23.