In the span of my mother's lifetime, she lived to see a jumbo jet taking off at midnight from the Dallas airport flying over the Rocky Mountains with the 450 passengers, 40 members of the crew, two movie screens and of course a beverage bar.

My mother was fourteen years old when the Wright Brothers flew their first flyer in 1903.

My mother lived to be 99 years of age. Her lifetime spanned the time of the Wright Brothers' first flight to the introduction of the Boeing 747 super size passenger jet liner Boeing 747.

Boeing designed the 747 with the flight deck positioned above the area behind the flight deck used for seating above the main passenger deck creating the jet liner's characteristic hump.

In the span of my mother's lifetime, she lived to see a jumbo jet taking off at midnight from the Dallas airport flying over the Rocky Mountains with the 450 passengers, 40 members of the crew, two movie screens and of course a beverage bar. All set to land in San Francisco at 2:30 in the morning.

A modified Boeing 747-200 was chosen by NASA to carry its space shuttle orbiters between Edwards AFB in California and the Kennedy space center in Florida. The orbiter adds 148,000 pounds to the 747’s 775,000 pound gross weight.

Wilbur died very young in 1912, only 9 years after Kitty Hawk. Orville then continued to develop the Wright planes.

On Sept. 9, 1908 at Fort Myers, Orville simultaneously established several records when he flew the first Wright plane made under government contract. That same year the Wright's fulfilled a contract with the U.S. Army Signal Corps. to fly for 10 minutes at a speed of 40 miles per hour.

In 1910, Orville Wright formed the first exhibition team using Wright planes and toured Europe. He became an immediate international celebrity.

My connection to the Wright Brothers: Orville and I shared the same lifetime. I would have been honored to have had a conversation with him. I learned to fly only two years after he died.

My connection to history: I am humbled to have touched the unpainted muslin fabric covering the wings of the original 1903 Wright plane.