God told Nathan to pass along a couple of questions from to David, "Are you the one who should build Me a house to dwell in?"

Many times in the Bible the Lord directs questions to specific individuals. I find it interesting and helpful to pay attention to the context and the answers to those questions. David gets his share of them. Second Samuel 7 recounts a time when David is firmly established as a powerful king, the nation of Israel was at peace, and David had moved into his newly constructed palace. David had time to consider the fact that he was living in a palace of cedar while the Lord's Ark of the Covenant was still being housed in a tent. Understandably, David was troubled by that situation. David consulted with the prophet Nathan about his plans to rectify the situation. Nathan initially gave his approval, but a night time word from the Lord changed his mind.

God told Nathan to pass along a couple of questions from to David, "Are you the one who should build Me a house to dwell in? 6 "For I have not dwelt in a house since the day I brought up the sons of Israel from Egypt, even to this day; but I have been moving about in a tent, even in a tabernacle. 7 "Wherever I have gone with all the sons of Israel, did I speak a word with one of the tribes of Israel, which I commanded to shepherd My people Israel, saying, 'Why have you not built Me a house of cedar?'" (2 Samuel 7:5-7, NASU) These two questions could be interpreted to indicate some anger or displeasure by the Lord against David, but I don't think so. Later, God would explain to David that he would not be allowed to build a house for the Lord because he was a man of war and a man of bloodshed. Rather than chastising David, I think God is using this offer from David, to point out a great theological truth about the coming Messiah.

The Lord proceeded to point out to David that He rather than David would be the one to build a house, meaning the Lord was going to establish a royal lineage for David. Certainly, the Lord's house, The Temple, would be built. But it would be done by David's son, Solomon, the "man of peace." That point is clear, but it is equally clear that the Lord is teaching the great truth that the Savior of the world would come from David's house and that this Savior would build the true house, the spiritual house that would truly and eternally be "a house for the Lord's Name."

Was the Lord displeased that David was offering something that the Lord had never asked for? Or was the Lord taking this opportunity to reward David? I think that the Lord was letting David in on a wonderful secret, giving him a glimpse into the future seeing that his line would be blessed far beyond his imagination. I think the Lord was helping us to understand that His imagination, foresight, and His ability are much greater than David's or ours. David's and our feeble attempts to serve the Lord, to put Him first, demonstrate that we are ready to receive an outpouring of God's love and blessing. The Lord owns the whole world and needs nothing from us. He is always the Giver. We are always the receivers. He stands ready, willing, and able to shower us with favor. I implore you to indicate your readiness to receive God's blessing by aligning your priorities with His and by attempting to the best of your feeble knowledge and ability to serve and worship Him.