It was a poor people campaign revival, but middle class was there too. It's the first time I've seen people of different interests coming together for a common goal. It's showing the new trend of how America is coming together for a crisis not mentioned by main stream media, the real fight for clean air, water, and soil . . . and a better economy.

Dear Editor,

In three articles, The Advocate reported barges spilling tons and tons of oil on January 4, 2018 in St. James Parish, February 11, 2018 in St. John Parish, and April 12, 2018 in New Orleans near the French Quarter.

In August, The Advocate reported that, "before Sunshine Bridge crash, operator had 32 collisions and likely wasn't fined, records show."

According to payscale.com, the average tugboat captain salary is $103,071 dollars. According to EnvironmentalPollutionCenters.org, short term symptoms from oil spills exposure are the following: memory loss, dizziness and irritability, headache, nausea and vomiting, chest pain, coughing and lung problems, fatigue, skin injuries, rash, and blisters, eye sores, or confusion.

Moreover, long term symptoms from oil spill exposures are the following: melanoma, skin cancer, lung cancer, liver cancer and hepatitis B/C infections on fatty liver tissues, or leukemia.

I wanted to put something in the paper concerning the Sunshine Bridge and Marquette Transportation and seeking help from outside sources to help the people that have been affected by the crash. I went to Kentucky and Cincinnati recently as a guest speaker at an event organized by organizations and citizens of Cincinnati, Ohio, and North Kentucky.

I think it's very important, and it will show how middle class republicans are affected too. It was a poor people campaign revival, but middle class was there too. It's the first time I've seen people of different interests coming together for a common goal. It's showing the new trend of how America is coming together for a crisis not mentioned by main stream media, the real fight for clean air, water, and soil . . . and a better economy.

Ohio and Kentucky residents came to me for help on their communities. We have way cleaner water than their water that was recently polluted by six giant coal barges sinking in the Ohio River near some of the wealthiest communities in the United States.

Marquette Transportation, the barge company that hit the Sunshine Bridge, is headquartered in Kentucky.

If we all can raise awareness of and take major legal actions against irresponsible barges and barge companies alongside irresponsible chemical plants, pipelines, trains, etc., we can help save millions and millions of people's lives.

I tell people I'm not trying to shut down all oil and gas stuff all together in an instant. I'm trying to make them finally come in compliance to protect communities and workers. We also need to move to alternative forms of energy and stuff like other countries in the Paris Agreement that the United States recently pulled away from.

That job field creates tons of jobs according to an article, U.S. Clean Energy Jobs Surpass Fossil Fuel Employment by Natural Resources Defense Council.

Two barge workers near Donaldsonville fell off barges according to two articles, "Body of missing mariner recovered from Mississippi River," by Workboat.com and "Coast Guard suspends search for barge worker who fell in river near Donaldsonville," by WAFB. We don't need new chemical infrastructure.

Louisiana is becoming too clogged with those, which takes away focus from education, tourism, small business growth, etc. Settlement claims are not how it used to be. People don't get money to help themselves like they used to. And workforce safety laws took major rollbacks according to the article, "Trump rolls back worker safety rules," by Politico.com.

Industrial projects make millions, but the cost on human lives is too unbearable with many sad, death stories of families affected by irresponsible companies.

Where is governmental protection?

Sincerely,

Travis London

Donaldsonville, Louisiana