Just last week, former Secretary of State and current member of the College Football Playoff selection committee Condoleezza Rice along with fellow member and Pac-12 Commissioner Larry Scott squashed any talk of expanding the playoffs.

Four is good, but eight is better.

Just last week, former Secretary of State and current member of the College Football Playoff selection committee Condoleezza Rice along with fellow member and Pac-12 Commissioner Larry Scott squashed any talk of expanding the playoffs.

Both think that the four-team field is the perfect setup for college football.

Rice went on to say, "I feel pretty strongly about four now because I thought that the rivalry weekend--that Saturday after Thanksgiving--almost felt like a play-in game. I agree that if it got much larger, I don't think you would have that momentum coming out of the regular season, so it's the best possible scenario."

Scott echoed that sentiment and said that he didn't see "any movement to expand beyond four."

Look, I'm forever grateful that college football finally took a step into the 21st century and introduced a playoff for Division-I teams. It was decades upon decades long overdue.

It didn't make much sense to have every sport known to man decided by playoffs--even Division II and III football--but to have Division I use their own set of senseless and archaic rules.

For a while there, I seriously doubted that I would ever see a playoff in my lifetime, but it finally happened, and I'm tremendously thankful for that.

And for now, I'm fine with there being just four teams. Like they say, you have to crawl before you can walk. You have to walk before you can run.

I understand that it's a lot to ask to go from no playoff system to an eight-team operation. So, to get our feet wet and to work out the kinks, four is reasonable here in the playoffs' infancy stage.

However, we can't afford to stay at four forever. Once we get a hang of this, we have to expand.

No, I'm not asking for all kinds of automatic bids and double-digit selections. I'm not asking for a March Madness-type of scenario.

I'm simply suggesting that the playoff field needs to balloon to eight. To me, eight is the perfect number for a college football playoff. I've been saying this for over a decade now--long before the playoff ever seemed possible.

Rice and other members of the committee have argued that the expansion would water down the game and take away from the excitement of the season, but that's the same thing people said before the four-team playoff was implemented.

Finishing in the top eight is no small task--especially in cut-throat conferences like the SEC and Pac-12.

Most teams that would squeeze into the field would either be undefeated or only sporting one loss. Maybe one or two teams with strong resumés might barely get in with two losses to their names.

Either way, it wouldn't be easy getting into the mix. It's never easy winning 10 and 11 games--even if you're a proven super-power.

Look at this past season. In the top eight, there was one undefeated team, five one-loss teams and only two schools with a pair of losses.

Sixth-ranked TCU was left out. They went 12-1 and absolutely destroyed ninth-ranked Ole Miss in the Peach Bowl.

Are you telling me that they wouldn't have had a legitimate chance to win it all if they were included in the playoffs? They were playing just as well as anybody at the end of the season.

Even eighth-ranked Michigan State came from 20 down to upset fifth-ranked Baylor in the Cotton Bowl. Are you going to tell me that they had no chance to make some noise if they were included in the playoff mix?

These teams could have made the postseason even more crazy and suspenseful.

That's why the playoff needs to be pushed to eight teams. That's why it's the perfect number.

Any team in the top eight has a real chance to bring home a title. However, once you get past that top eight, that's when teams' championship potential begins to dwindle.

Ole Miss, Arizona and Kansas State were ranked nine, 10 and 11 this past season. It's pretty safe to say that those teams wouldn't have stacked up in the playoffs--especially after their bowl performances.

Scott went on to say that in order to expand the playoffs, the "Power Five" conferences would have to be granted automatic bids--which would water things down.

I don't understand this reasoning at all. Why would there need to be automatic bids for an eight-team playoff?

It's simple. Don't grant any freebees. Keep it how it is right now--just double the content. The committee will pick the eight best teams in the country--regardless of conference affiliation.

I'm not asking for 64. I'm not asking for 32 or even 16, but eight would sure be great.