Eleven-time World Champion Barrel Racer, Charmayne James was at Lamar-Dixon Expo Center last week sharing with aspiring barrel racers the knowledge, techniques and care that her become a champion.


Eleven-time World Champion Barrel Racer, Charmayne James was at Lamar-Dixon Expo Center last week sharing with aspiring barrel racers the knowledge, techniques and care that her become a champion.

Thrity-two students from throughout the Southeast attended  the 4-day clinic, where James provided individual instruction and techniques to work on at home. James also talked with students about keeping a positive attitude and mental preparation for a race along with nutrition and care for horses.

James earned her first title of World Champion Barrel Racer at the young of 14 in 1985 and continued to hold the title for the next ten years.

She won each of the consecutive titles riding the same horse, Scamper. Together the pair dominated the barrel racing world in the 1980s and early 1990s. 

The legendary bay gelding horse will forever be known  as one of rodeo’s greatest animal athletes. Scamper, who was inducted in 1986 as a member of the ProRodeo Hall of Fame, has retired from barrel racing but still lives with James on her ranch in New Mexico. Also on her ranch, is a horse named Clayton, an identical genetic match to the great Scamper. Clayton is the first clone to be offered at stud in the United States and is now in his second year of producing great horses.

In addition to her 11 World titles, James is also the all-time leading money earner in barrel racing, and in 1990 she became the first cowgirl to earn a million dollars.

She holds the record for most consecutive National Finals Rodeo qualifications, with 19, beating both men and women rodeo athletes. In 1987, James wore the coveted #1 back number at the NFR for winning the most money out of all the contestants among the nine rodeo events.

James’s accomplishments not only set her apart in the rodeo arena, but in all professional sports. Impressivley James holds more World Championships than any other woman in all of professional sports.

James retired from in 2002 after winning her final World Championship to conduct barrel racing clinics, like the one held at Lamar-Dixon. In addition to her clinics, she is a popular speaker and clinician at horse expos and events worldwide.