"This is the perfect example of our friends and community leaders and business leaders coming out, acknowledging what our deputies do every day and every night," Sheriff Jeff Wiley said.

"Uncle Mike" Jagneaux and a squad of volunteers cooked meatballs, potatoes, homemade chips and other goodies for hundreds of Ascension Parish, Gonzales and even Louisiana State Troopers last week. The reason was simple: they felt like honoring the boys in blue.

Sheriff Wiley and Chief Deputy Bobby Webre spoke to the large group of officers gathered at the Ascension Parish Training Facility. Webre led an invocation before lunch. Door prizes were handed out, and camaraderie was apparent.

"This is the perfect example of our friends and community leaders and business leaders coming out, acknowledging what our deputies do every day and every night," Sheriff Jeff Wiley said.

Those who contributed to the first annual luncheon were acknowledged by Sheriff Wiley.

"It's always appreciated, and in this case it's the Farm Bureau Group in Ascension, Jack Duplessis and his crew, old friend of mine, Mike Jagneaux. They call him Uncle Mike, who every weekend is devoted for the last several years to serving some needy cause with no compensation.

"Layne's Jewelers, also a long-time friend of ours and a benefactor, and FAB-CON, which is a company located corporately in Ascension with a lot of business presence in Plaquemines Parish and in Morgan City area, and a local businessman who shall remain nameless named Jimmy Boyce."

Jack Duplessis said that they were trying to get this started and hopefully be the first of many lunches to come for law enforcement.

"It was my brother-in-law's idea," Duplessis said. "Known as Uncle Mike, he's been cooking for a lot of benefits."

The group intends on feeding fire departments in the near future, as well. The group began prepping the meal at five o'clock in the morning.

"We've been planning this for a couple months," Duplessis said. "You just hope an emergency doesn't occur where they have to be called out."

Jagneaux was a sheet metalist by trade, so he has a collection of enormous pots and things to cook for enormous groups of people. Jagneaux said that after the flood for the past two years, his group has fed several thousand people.

"Benefits for the kids, cancer . . . a lot of times we'll get a sponsor to come in, you know one person can't do it every time," Jagneaux said. "I know Bobby Webre really well, and we were talking. I said there's so much negativity about the police department, it's time for us to do something to show them otherwise."